• Launch of the Second Toolbox of research principles in an Aboriginal context: ethics, respect, fairness, reciprocity, collaboration and culture
Nov 23, 2018

Val-d’Or, November 22, 2018 – The second edition of the Toolbox of research principles in an Aboriginal context: ethics, respect, fairness, reciprocity, collaboration and culture was launched as part of the 4th Seminar on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples. This Toolbox is a product of a partnership between the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT), the Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission (FNQLHSSC) and the DIALOG (Aboriginal Peoples Research and Knowledge Network), under the co-direction of Karine Gentelet (UQO), Suzy Basile (UQAT) and Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh (FNQLHSSC).

 

Three years after the publication of the first edition, which quickly became a reference for First Nations, the Inuit, academics and professionals in practice settings, the editorial committee has decided to enhance documentation on issues of increasing concern for Indigenous organizations. These include the ethics of protecting material and immaterial cultural heritage and of open data. The context in which knowledge and heritage is disseminated is in full technological effervescence. It would therefore appear important to offer both food for thought and tools to support the First Nations and the Inuit, to inform decision-making and to help identify the major issues calling for reflection. The Toolbox will also benefit researchers and students wishing to learn more or to deepen their understanding of research in an Indigenous context.

 

While this one-of-a-kind publication was designed to evolve, its overarching goal remains unchanged: to document concrete experiences and suggest tools likely to facilitate dialogue, collaboration and sharing between the various partners participating in a joint research process. In addition to being informative and instructive, the Toolbox promotes research and collaboration practices with Indigenous peoples.

 

The updating of the Toolbox was made possible thanks to a grant from the Social Sciences and

Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada.

 

This publication is available here.